Website Wednesday

Website Wednesday is an occasional feature in which we highlight one (or a couple) of sites from the Billions floating around the Intertoobz that just might help you with your Herculean task of educating inquiring minds. Any and all suggestions for future editions are welcome.

Behold, a list of the top 100 tools for learning, according to a UK survey of “582 Learning Professionals Worldwide.” There are no surprises in the top 10, but from 20 to 50, there are some interesting tools, and from 50 to 100 it’s like the Wild West. Check ’em out.

# 89 Learnist is one I hadn’t heard of before looking at the list. I’m not sure how or if I’d use it, but it looks pretty cool. Note any good ones in the comments.

(Oops…this was supposed to publish this morning. I guess I pulled the wrong lever. Sorry.)

PS: There’s an interesting discussion starting in the comments of the “Five Things to Tell Your Students about Cell Phones.” Might want to take a peek.

Website Wednesday

Website Wednesday is a regular feature in which we highlight one (or a couple) of sites from the Billions floating around the Intertoobz that just might help you with your Herculean task of educating inquiring minds. Any and all suggestions for future editions are welcome.

You Are What You Read is an interesting site for finding (and making) booklists. It takes advantage of our celebrity-obsessed, voyeuristic culture and turns those tendencies into motivation to read. Not too shabby.

The site has people–celebrities and shlubs alike–post their “Bookprint” (the list of the five books that have been most influential in their own lives), while allowing for searches and comparisons and connections of all sorts. I found the site while reading Valerie Strauss’s The Answer Sheet this summer where she talked about the site and shared Bill and Hillary Clinton’s lists, along with Bill Gates’.

But that’s not all. Instead of just looking up names and reading over their book print, you can look up individual books and see who listed them or search by age or search by location. And when you look up a book, you get three lists–one that shows the books that are most likely to be linked to that book (i.e. show up on the book prints that include it), a map showing the last 300 global locations of people who listed that book, and the list of people who included it.

There are lists from celebrities, educators (teachers and administrators), librarians (who, of course, are educators, but distinguished ones!), and authors. You have to register with Scholastic before you can put your own list together, but it’s easy and free. Here’s mine.

Enjoy!

Website Wednesday

Website Wednesday is a regular feature in which we highlight one (or a couple) of sites from the Billions floating around the Intertoobz that just might help you with your Herculean task of educating inquiring minds. Any and all suggestions for future editions are welcome.

I spent yesterday afternoon at the Faculty Council hosted focus group on Professional Development with Franklin and Alicia from the Development Task Force, which got me thinking about various things I want to learn and this list that I stumbled on a few weeks ago. It’s not just one Web site this week, people; it’s 12 dozen. That’s right…144 sites, compiled by a blogger for a list of places to go to self educate.

The blog where this post resides, “Marc and Angel Hack Life,” might be a legitimately helpful destination in its own right for a lot of people. They do lists there (with links!). Things like this or this or this.

Lots of resources here to explore. And they might even take requests!

 

We’re #10!!

Of the Top Ten Google searches by Chicagoans in 2010.

There are four school related items in the list, including three higher education institutions, but there is an interesting difference between them and us.

#2 is “UIC Blackboard,” so that’s clearly students (and faculty) looking for info about the school where they already are. #7 is “NEIUPort,” so I’m guessing that’s pretty much the same thing.

And then there’s us, just “Harold Washington College;” I’m guessing that means that the people looking for information on us are looking out of interest rather than necessity. We didn’t get much love from the writer who chose to say nothing about us, but still that’s some pretty good “brand recognition,” I’d say…wouldn’t you?

End of the Year List Time

I love it when people start publishing lists–100 Notable Books, Ten Best Books, Ten Great Bands You Didn’t Hear on The Radio This Year, Ten Best Plays…all of that.

It encourages me to make a bunch of my own lists (and sometimes lists of lists), which then get thrown in piles of paper scattered in the various spaces of my life to be re-discovered months or years down the road, which feels like finding money in the pocket of a jacket you haven’t worn in a long time.

So, I’ll post them as I see them, and if you see any, post ’em for the rest of us list makers.

~Selected New Books on Higher Education

~New York Times Ten Best Books of 2010 (Look for the link to their list of 100 Notable Books from 2010, while you’re there)

 

 

Website Wednesday

Website Wednesday is a regular feature in which we highlight one (or a couple) of sites from the Billions floating around the Intertoobz that just might help you with your Herculean task of educating inquiring minds. Any and all suggestions for future editions are welcome.

I believe that I mentioned that this is Free Speech Week, right?

So today’s FEATURED site is one that has links (audio and text) to some of the greatest speeches (as ranked by AmericanRhetoric.com–I don’t know anything about them, but I love Top 100 lists, if only for the arguments they are sure to catalyze, and this one is full of speeches I haven’t heard. It’s a little heavy on Kennedys and Roosevelts, but there are some gems in there, including my second favorite Nobel Prize in Literature Acceptance Speech. To not include my favorite in there is borderline criminal.

“Think of our lives and tell us your particularized world. Make up a story. Narrative is radical, creating us at the very moment it is being created. We will not blame you if your reach exceeds your grasp; if love so ignites your words they go down in flames and nothing is left but their scald. Or if, with the reticence of a surgeon’s hands, your words suture only the places where blood might flow. We know you can never do it properly – once and for all. Passion is never enough; neither is skill. But try. For our sake and yours forget your name in the street; tell us what the world has been to you in the dark places and in the light. Don’t tell us what to believe, what to fear. Show us belief s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul.”

Mmm..mmm…glorious. But like I said, I enjoy the arguments as much as anything…