First, There Is Wonder…

Or so says Socrates at one point in Plato’s Theatetus. While thinking about what I could post to support today’s HWFDW theme of “Teaching & Learning,” I thought of that quote and this piece in Aeon that I read back in June.

Here’s a small chunk:

Bringing these threads together, we can see that science, religion and art are unified in wonder. Each engages our senses, elicits curiosity and instils reverence. Without wonder, it is hard to believe that we would engage in these distinctively human pursuits. Robert Fuller, professor of religious studies at Bradley University in Illinois, contends that it is ‘one of the principal human experiences that lead to belief in an unseen order’. In science, that invisible order might include microorganisms and the invisible laws of nature. In religion, we find supernatural powers and divine agents. Artists invent new ways of seeing that give us a fresh perspective on the world we inhabit.

Art, science and religion appear to be uniquely human institutions. This suggests that wonder has a bearing on human uniqueness as such, which in turn raises questions about its origins. Did wonder evolve? Are we the only creatures who experience it?…

Read the whole thing, and then go find something that will provoke the wonder in you.

Website Wednesday

Long time reader, Ephrem Rabin suggested this one a while ago, but I’ve only recently had a chance to check it out–it’s called “Open Culture” and it’s a site for finding and sharing resources of all kinds related to teaching and learning

It’s jammed with great stuff–rare film clips, the only known existent voice recording of Sigmund Freud, Jorge Luis Borges lecturing on metaphor, Henry Rollins, and that’s just the stuff that was posted this week. Just in case you want to do some learning over the summer…