Special Event for Great Women’s Colleges

This Thursday! Per our Transfer Magician, Ellen Goldberg:

I invited 4300 rock star women with GPAs of 3.4 or higher in the district to attend Information Sessions (at HWC and Wright College too) for Smith College or Mount Holyoke College.  The one at HWC will be on Thursday, October 30, 2014 in room 102 from 3-4:30 p.m. Smith and Holyoke are two amazing liberal arts schools for women in Massachusetts who love our students and typically give them full-ride scholarships. I went back to the data from the information session last year in October of 2013, and out of the 10 women that attended, two are at Mount Holyoke, and one is at Smith. That’s so awesome that 3 out of 10 actually transferred to New England! Dulce Mora Flores (our Jack Kent Cooke Winner) went to Smith College. Janelle Thorson from HWC went to Mount Holyoke and Kimberly Neil from Malcolm X College went to Mount Holyoke. Check out the link with photos of the women at HWC, Malcolm X, and Wright that transferred this fall! http://bit.ly/Smith-HolyokeCCCTumblr We owe are thanks to the amazing Professor Emeritus, Betty Harris, who established the relationship with Smith and Holyoke! It has really grown over the last decade!

Please remind any great students to go and check it out–they love our students and take good care of them. It’s  a great opportunity for non-traditional, women students. In the last two years, two of the students who received full rides were great students who got the email about the event, didn’t read it, and only went because someone told them about it, which led to them finding, in their words, their “dream school” and getting full rides.

Tell someone to go. Even if she doesn’t love these schools, she may get the message that she can dream big.

Is there trouble brewing? Check it out. The title is a link to the full story.

New standards seek to measure what students actually know

A new set of standards, published by the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment, outlines what skills and knowledge students should possess after earning a college degree. The Degree Qualifications Profile was developed with funding from the Lumina Foundation, and its accuracy has been tested at 400 colleges and universities in 45 states over the past four years.

Policies that Cause Rather than Solve Problems

Today I received an email from a student in my 9:30 am class. it read:

“Forgot my id. I will be late. I’m in the front but they won’t let me in.”

This particular student is a student with special needs, and so this student has a note-taker. The note-taker was there at 9:30, but the student was not. By 9:45, the student had not arrived in class. Unfortunately, I checked my email early this morning, but did not check it in the time between my arrival at school and first class, and so, following policy, the note-taker left.

 

About 20 minutes later, just under the halfway point of the class, the student came in to see a board full of notes and material on Categorical propositions. The work we did in class today laid groundwork for the next three weeks worth of material. Students who were there experienced a huge and important front-load the second major unit of the class. Students who missed it will be scrambling to catch up  right up until the mid-term exam.

Her email was sent at 9:04 am, by the way.

So, this student did everything right except bring her school ID with her, and now her success in the class is imperiled. All for a policy that is ostensibly aimed at “improving student safety.” Do we really need to say that most of the college shootings of the last 10 years have been carried out by people who had IDs? Do we need to point out that our college is objectively safe–relative to other colleges and other City Colleges, based on the Clery Report data? Do we really need to point out that the last time we did a security survey, there was much more concern among faculty about students than about strangers? About being alone in stairwells and hallways and offices than about people without ids wandering in?

If a few students can bring about a policy change (that was the reason provided at the State of the College address, right?) with major potential implications on student learning and work and the rest–without consulting Faculty Council or anything else–then perhaps a few faculty belly aching about a stupid policy that creates problems without solving any can get a similar result. Let’s say my bag is stolen with my wallet and ID in it. Let’s say further that I don’t have cash on me (typical). I suppose I could borrow some, but let’s say I arrive at a time and day where the people I see that I know are, like me, without cash or access to their ATM cards for some reason. Should I take a sick day? Should I send a note to my students to wait, ride the train home, scrounge up some quarters from the couch and laundry room and my kid’s bank and return and pay $10 so I can work?

“Of course not,” someone will say. You will see someone who will vouch for you or loan you the money or whatever.” And they’d be right. I would be slightly and probably only temporarily inconvenienced by the situation, because I’m white, I’m old, I’m male, I’m employed, I’d be in professional (or semi-professional) dress and so on–take your pick of possible reasons I’d have it easy.

My student, however, and likely many students, does not live with the same privileges. My student was sent home on a day that she needed to be in class, on a day when she arrived 30 minutes before class was to start, only to return to find that, because she had been sent home to get a piece of plastic with her picture on it, she had not only missed important material but missed out on the chance to have her special needs accommodated. And for what? To what end?

I am hopping mad right now.

The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek and the Academic Calendar: Art and Academics

Glyptotek

“City Colleges will be performing scheduled maintenance on our UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) from 1:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 28th. All CCC network systems, including Blackboard, email, PeopleSoft, and My.CCC.edu, will be unavailable during this time. We apologize for any inconvenience this outage may cause. Please plan accordingly. If you have any questions, please contact the IT helpdesk at cohelpdesk@ccc.edu.”

CAST Events

Shared by request:

 

Colleagues,
 
Start the new school year off right with some new technology tips for your teaching toolkit. CAST is proud to sponsor two exciting events this month for faculty members!
 
iPad Training: Friday 9/12, 9am-4pm
Learn new ways to use the iPad to improve your teaching experience (for a full list of topics, see attachment). Attendees will receive a stipend of $25 per hour for the 6-hour workshop and must attend the full day. Attendance is strictly limited to 20 faculty members, so sign up today! RSVP here: RSVP for iPad Training 9/12. For more information, contact Kevin Smith, Larnell Dunkley, or Chao Lu.
 
Blackboard Conference: Friday 9/26, 9am-3:30pm
Learn new techniques and share ideas with colleagues! Workshops will be graded by difficulty level to provide a comprehensive experience for all users. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by Mon 9/8 using this link: RSVP for Blackboard Conference 9/26. For more information, contact Megan Ritt or Andrew Cutcher. (We also need presenters! Sign up via the RSVP link).
 
Thanks for reading! See you at the CAST kick-off meeting next Thursday 9/11, 3:30-4:30pm, room 1046.
 
Best,
 
Andrew Cutcher and Megan Ritt
CAST Coordinators

 

Can You See the Future?

Both Ephrem and Ivan have been after me over the last couple of weeks to set up another Football Picking Contest and I aim to please (where I can), so here it is.

The site is called “Office Football Pool” but this is just a contest, not a pool. It is free to join and your ‘winnings’ will be entirely ego related. Once upon a time I made certificates and offered non-valuable prizes, but I’m about five years behind on that so you’ll have to come up with your own reward if and when you win.

Once you go to the site, you’ll have to set up an account (unless you have one from last year), but it’s free and easy. Also, like last year’s, you’ll be picking against the spread and earning points based on both the correctness of your picks and your confidence ranking of them (earning 14 points for the pick you are most confident about and 1 for the pick you are least confident about).

Good skill to you!